subclass 300 Visa Processing Times in 2020


Offshore Prospective Marriage Visa (subclass 300) Processing Times in 2020.

These are the official times quoted by Australian Immigration, for the visas finalised in each month.

  • May 2020: Processing times are not available. (The numbers of subclass 300 grants in May appear to be much lower than normal)
  • Apr 2020: Processing times are not available.
  • Mar 2020: 13-17 = 75% took up to 13 months.  10% took over 17 months.
  • Feb 2020: 15-21 = 75% took up to 15 months.  10% took over 21 months.
  • Jan 2020: 16-22 = 75% took up to 16 months.  10% took over 22 months.
  • Dec 2019: 17-23 = 75% took up to 17 months.  10% took over 23 months.

Last updated: 26 June 2020 (for month ending 1 May 2020)

The Immigration page actually says: 26 June 2020 (for month ending 1 May 2020) It normally says the last day of the month. Confusing?




They show the maximum time that it took for the fastest 75%, and the minimum time it took for the slowest 10%, of visas finalised in that month.

For examples of ACTUAL processing times see the comments section at the end of this post..
If you wish to add YOUR grant times to these pages, please complete our subclass 300 survey here.

It should be noted that the average processing time is often a lot less than the 75% maximum figure quoted.





The average processing time for the 2,705 subclass 300 visas finalised in the 2018/19 year was 334 calendar days (11.0 months).
75% were done in under 391 days (12.9 months).

Source: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au

997.1 - 217,598


The information we give is based on personal experiences, reading and formulation of available statistics. Some Visa Applicants might find an Experienced Australian Migration Agent of great assistance.

58 thoughts on “subclass 300 Visa Processing Times in 2020”


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  2. Plus to add to my previous message
    The Philippines is currently getting positive cases in the hundreds each day
    We are aware of one Filipino man who got his pmv300 to Australia granted in March this year
    He then applied three times for a travel exemption. Third time granted. He arrived in Australia June 27 and on June 29 tested positive for corona.
    So my fiancé and I don’t hold high hopes for travel exemption to Australia from the Philippines.
    Even though we’ve currently paid thousands for an application to sit in cyberspace for twenty months, perhaps not fair to have others pay for quarantine. Although we could also pay for that if needed. Though being apart it would seem a waste.
    Perhaps I’m just venting but thanks for listening


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  4. You – What is your exact timeline? What date did you have the wedding date set as, in your NOIM?
    We lodged October 2018
    Our original noim was January 5 2020
    That only goes 18 months and has expired
    We have not renewed as well frankly I’m not sure we won’t have to wait another 18 months and then get it a third time.
    When someone actually looks at our application then I can get set another date for that
    I would say the same applies to health checks, that I think cover just one year. So due to the slowness of processing, some of our at the time of lodgement complete application, is now less so
    We have updated the application several times.
    When I have visited her and when she has come here. As well as stuff like calls and FaceTimes and presents we’ve sent each other.
    We have been understanding during the current pandemic, however there was plenty of time before that for ours to have been looked at,
    We are not like many couples who I’ve read their story. They met once then six months later then applied and having seen each other since,while waiting for pmv.
    We met in person five times then applied and since waiting have met five more times in person.
    We even waited almost two years from when we first met to lodge application. As we felt that shows genuineness.


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  6. You – I would suggest doing an exemption request. It might just bump up your PMV grant.

    It would ?
    Well I can understand slowness In processing now
    Most of my annoyance is why we couldn’t be processed before say feb this year.
    Why countries that are slow in processing can’t get help from others. Ok some do but not the one doing ours.
    We have seen each other a lot in person over the last 3 years. For two people living in different countries. So we haven’t applied for exemption to travel on tourist visa this year. As still hoping maybe soon our application will be looked at.
    Plus don’t want to come across as desperate and sometimes I think acting needy can look suspicious. Some couples married for years spend time apart – spouses in the navy etc

    1. You have seen a few that have applied for an exemption and been granted a visitor visa so that the couple can spend time together. When we did our PMV, before COVID, we applied for a visitor visa so we could wait for the PMV grant, together in Australia. It is not uncommon, and not treated as desperate.

      What is your exact timeline? What date did you have the wedding date set as, in your NOIM?

      An exemption request might just get the Australian side, who do the exemptions, to push Manila to expedite your PMV. I am sure that one happened like that recently, where an exemption request resulted in the main visa being granted 3 weeks later.

      As far as other countries helping in the processing is concerned, they would still have to liaise with Manila, in getting the required confirmations.

      I’ve just checked my spreadsheet and I see quite a few other PMVs from around the world, where people are still waiting after around 20 months. Even from the same country with applications at about the same time. eg: One granted after 9 months but one still waiting at 20 months. There can be many reasons for delays in processing.

      A request to Home Affairs asking why the delay, might just help.


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  8. In reply to your message – That couple met in May 2018, in Australia, and were in a form of relationship until Dec 2018, albeit not living together. That was about 7 months. Then another month together in Perth during Nov/Dec 2019.
    That shows 8 months contact over a 24 month relationship. Was it every day? We don’t know and cannot assume either way.
    Living together is not a compulsory part of the application, although it often helps

    Reply function under the message not working

    That shows she was in the same area as him for eight months.
    My point is the processing time.
    December 2019 to June 2020

    We have been waiting since October 2018
    Yes we have updated our application at least ten times so far.
    We have done our part plus a lot extra – the at least ten updates so far. Showing each time we have visited in person. Evidence that we keep in contact and have done so every day since November 2016.
    Yes we have not missed a single day of either being in person together, or phone call, video call, iMessages – every day since November 2016
    I think now and long before now its about time they did something and proccessed our application.
    If one country is too slow then hand it to another

    We haven’t applied for any travel excemption, as we are waiting for the pmv300 to be processed.


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  10. Not my application. A woman from the uk and partner in Australia

    Timeline:-
    Met may 2018
    Did not live together at all!
    I returned to the UK Dec 2018

    Long distance relationship until now, except for a month in Nov/Dec 2019 when I came to Perth on holiday.

    Applied for Subclass 300 from London office 14Dec2019. Frontloaded.

    Mid May awarded travel exemption under ‘immediate family member’ to travel on my current eVisitor 651

    Request for more information last week, proof of divorce, which they did have if they’d read all the documents.

    PMV granted today June 30 2020 from Belgrade, Serbia (maybe London too busy🤔)

    Ok wow only one meeting in person
    No interview questions
    Barely 6 months processing time

    Meanwhile I’m near 21 months
    Ten meetings in person

    1. That couple met in May 2018, in Australia, and were in a form of relationship until Dec 2018, albeit not living together. That was about 7 months. Then another month together in Perth during Nov/Dec 2019.
      That shows 8 months contact over a 24 month relationship. Was it every day? We don’t know and cannot assume either way.
      Living together is not a compulsory part of the application, although it often helps.

      They did say they uploaded “heaps of photos”, and facetime screenshots and house party screenshots with families, during time apart.

      Not exactly only “only one meeting in person”.

      Getting the travel ban exemption 6 weeks earlier, might have helped to push the PMV forward. The content of that application would have been relevant.


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  12. Just read a woman in the uk who applied for the pmv300 to live in Australia. Got hers granted today
    Applied December 2019 granted June 30 2020
    Processed in Serbia
    Just two meetings face to face for a combined time of 5 weeks spent together.
    Yes while some of us are approaching 21 months and application hasn’t even been looked at


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  14. Admin can you explain this to me please
    Post from a pmv 300 group, members waiting to come to Australia

    Hi, I’ve just joined your lovely group.
    I applied for the PMV 14/12/2019 from the London office. I frontloaded everything… police checks, medical etc. I’m just waiting for a case officer to pick up my file and deal with it.
    In May I applied for an exemption to travel to Australia. I have a valid eVisitor 651 visa. When choosing which category to apply for the exemption under, I clicked on immediate family member, lol, I don’t know why I clicked that but then it was too late I couldn’t go back! (We have never lived together so couldn’t be classed as defacto, hence the PMV application).
    For the exemption application I attached stuff from the PMV application, our passports, birth certificates, 2 form 888 witness statements, my relationship statement, confirmation of my PMV application and proof of my 651 valid visa. I wrote a lengthy ‘story’ of why I thought I deserved an exemption. Mainly that I had not seen anyone I knew for 8 weeks. I was totally isolated because I worked away from home. But also 1st April I lost my job too. My mental health was suffering and every time I spoke with my fiance on WhatsApp I was crying. He wanted me with him where he could look after me.
    24hrs after submitting the request for exemption, I got approved as an ‘immediate family member’ 😳
    Shocked, but happy. I fly on the 8th July 🎉🇦🇺
    Edited… when I get to Perth and through my quarantine I will apply for the Subclass 600 so that I can stay until my 300 is approved. Not sure yet about leaving the country to get it approved but will deal with that when it happens.

    Seriously what the ? Went on here

    1. Living together is not always a requirement to be classed as a family member or defacto.

      However it sounds like you got the exemption on the compassionate grounds.

      The immigration officer, that considered your application, would have reviewed your 300 application and then had compassion towards your situation.

      It will be interesting to see when you get the PMV granted.

      It would be good if travel to NZ and back is permitted by then, to allow the visa activation trip using NZ.

      1. That is not my application
        My confusion is on how it possibly got approved for an exemption to travel. The couple obviously is not immediate family or family in general
        Compassionate grounds ?
        That she is sad ?
        She still has to in the future leave Australia for the pmv to be granted
        I don’t see the point of travel restrictions, when they appear to be so easily gotten around.
        Two from people just trying 3 or 4 times
        This one from a girl saying she’s sad.

        How does this differ from any tourist visa, to which I thought there was still travel restrictions entering Australia ?

        1. You say the “The couple obviously is not immediate family or family in general“. Without seeing the original application, I would find it hard to make that decision. Do you know how long they have lived together? I would assume that the case officer, that reviewed the application, would have a better idea than me on their relationship status.

          You say “How does this differ from any tourist visa“. A PMV application is VERY different to a tourist visa. Not many of the normal 8+ million tourists to enter Australia each year have an Australian partner. A PMV application from a Tourist visa holder that might have lived with an Australian citizen, in a defacto type relationship for 10 or 11 months, is not a normal tourist visa holder.

          There are still travel restrictions for entering Australia, but that does not mean that no-one is allowed in.
          More than 60,000 international arrivals have arrived in Australia since late march, when Quarantine was brought into effect. That is about 700 arrivals per day, on average. Compared to nearer 30,000 per day in normal times.

          During just March 25 and May 6 2020, there were 2,937 exemptions granted, with almost three quarters being on humanitarian grounds or compassionate reasons.
          In that same period about 1,000 exemption requests were refused.

          That looks like about 75% of requests are granted, with 25% being refused.

          You say: “I don’t see the point of travel restrictions, when they appear to be so easily gotten around.”
          The point of the travel restrictions is to cut down the numbers of people entering Australia, to try to keep the virus transmission rate low. But the exemptions are there to allow a level of humanity, as one of the possible reasons.
          Cutting down to about 700 per day, from 30,000 per day, would make a massive difference to possible virus transmission rates, but still allowing some people to enter for various reasons.

          1. This couple has been together in person a total of five time, the longest period being for two months.
            They are not family in any legal definition.
            They have a pmv 300 but this has not been granted. She got an exemption to travel to Australia on her evisa 651
            So yes this exemption was given purely on a tourist visa.
            As I said they have only met five times and lived together for a maximum of two months. So yes just a tourist visa for which exemption was granted.
            Seeing as this persons tourist visa was given an exemption. I don’t see why anyone else’s should not.

          2. From more figures that I have seen, about 80% of exemption applications are granted, only about 20% are refused.

            Most exemptions are given for tourist visas, often when linked to a partner visa or PMV application.

            You say: “this exemption was given purely on a tourist visa.” However, that is not quite correct, as it was given on a tourist visa that is linked to a PMV application.

            Those with a partner visa that has been granted do not need an exemption, they are permitted to enter anyway.

            I am not sure what the problem is.

            Immigration choose to refuse about 20% of those exemption applications, often for reasons that include insufficient information received. I have seen some that have been refused and then reapplied for, but attaching more relationship information, and then they are granted.

            I saw one refusal, where the couple had met once, and spent 2 weeks together, having met online about 4 weeks earlier. Your example does not show how long they have known each other. That length of time might make a difference. Five meetings, and one being for 2 months?, shows a real relationship, maybe even a year or so long. The immigration officer would have that information, and decide accordingly.

            You say they have applied for a PMV, therefore the applicant is a fiance/fiancee. The PMV comes under the ‘Family and partner visas’ group. Consequently, the applicant is classed under Australian Immigration rules as a ‘partner or family member’.

            When you say that “They are not family in any legal definition“, it seems that Australian Immigration do not agree with you on that.

      2. Home affairs Australia website says this
        Prospective Marriage (subclass 300) visa holders can’t come to Australia at the moment.
        However you say – The PMV comes under the ‘Family and partner visas’ group. Consequently, the applicant is classed under Australian Immigration rules as a ‘partner or family member’.

        If you are correct then what is the hold up ? Why so few applications being processed ?
        People can work from home on a computer to process applicators and applicants can get tests etc
        Also is there still mandatory quarantine in Australia, and if so who is paying for people such as her to be quarantined ?

        1. Prospective Marriage (subclass 300) visa holders CAN come to Australia, once they are granted the travel ban exemption.
          This is the same as some other visa holders where the applicant or holder is a partner.

          The applicant is classed under Australian Immigration rules as a ‘partner or family member’, and those rules allow them to apply for an exemption to the travel ban.

          The only non PR visa holders that do not need to apply for an exemption are the 309 and 820 subclasses. The reason is that they have already proven a 12 month, or equivalent, defacto or married relationship.

          If a PMV300 holder or applicant can do the same, then there should be no issue in getting the exemption, even without ‘proving’ compassionate grounds.

          You ask: “Why so few applications being processed ?”
          It is because of the COVID-19 virus, and the various reasons that some applications cannot be finalised, but also, in my opinion, to reduce the numbers of people being able to enter Australia easily.

          Most cases in Australia are caused by international travellers arriving in the country.

          1. So in this couples case, she was granted an exemption on a tourist visa. Yes ok connected to the pmv300 you said. Then that is just adding risk here, ok she goes into quarantine, at tax payers expense ?
            I don’t see the point when they( processors) could have just waited until it was time to process her pmv300

            How many couples are living together in a country where one of them is a citizen of another country, and applying for a pmv300 ?
            Don’t expect you to know the numbers, I just think it would be a lot less common than many questions in the pmv300 application seem to assume

          2. For the Australian to be living overseas with a PMV applicant is not common, but does happen. They would probably have a higher chance of the exemption than most other PMV applicants.

            It would be safer if no international arrivals were allowed in, but Australia seems to look for exemptions to allow some people in. The media would hit the government hard if they took too tough an approach. However, with cases rising again, and another death, (the previous death was 23rd May) it might be time to clamp down a bit harder.

            With States now being able to charge for Quarantine it might put some people off arriving. Queensland for example is charging people almost $3,000 for their quarantine costs.


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  16. So website says pmv300 visa applicants can’t currently enter Australia
    Yet I know of two couples that applied for an exemption, and they were granted. No the circumstances were not what I would consider extreme.
    One couple just sent in four, the other just complained about waiting 22 months for their application to get looked at

    1. Will add
      One of the couples who was granted a travel ban exemption to come to Australia
      Have only stayed together in person for 2 months at the longest

      1. I’m reading all this and laughing Rex, you are making things up that you know nothing about. Get your facts right. This was my post and we have not met just 5 times, I lived in WA for a year and we met then… over 2 years ago. As for living together, we haven’t done that at all, hence applying for the PMV. As for getting the exemption, I put forward my case and some very nice person approved it. Oh and watch this space for news on the PMV, no doubt you’ll have lots to say about that.

    2. Immigration may not have worded their site correctly, they actually state:

      Partner (subclasses 100, 309, 801, 820) and Child (subclasses 101, 102, 445) visa holders can come to Australia. You do not need to request an exemption.
      Prospective Marriage (subclass 300) visa holders can’t come to Australia at the moment.

      I feel they should have this wording, which is actually more accurate:

      Partner (subclasses 100, 309, 801, 820) and Child (subclasses 101, 102, 445) visa holders can come to Australia. You do not need to request an exemption.
      Prospective Marriage (subclass 300) visa holders can’t come to Australia at the moment. You need to request an exemption, to be allowed to enter.

      I added the extra in red at the end of the 2nd line.

      There does appear to be little consistency with grant decisions. I have seen a 309 Partner visa applicant, married for over a year but the 309 not yet granted, and their exemption application was refused twice, before getting a grant on the third attempt.


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  19. Some Actual subclass 300 finalisations in March 2020.
    Processing times are shown from the initial 300 application date.

    300 Finalised after 9.6 months, from Indonesia
    300 Finalised after 21.1 months, from Philippines

    1. 9.6 months from Indonesia
      21 months from Philippines
      Yes I’ve noticed a lot of country based racism.
      Even Filipinos who are living in a country outside of the Philippines, get processed a lot quicker

      1. I don’t think it is racism. The Australian Embassy in the Philippines employs locally engaged staff to undertake research, which includes checks on visa applications etc. It was one of these that communicated with us for our subclass 300.
        On an older positions vacant at Manila Embassy, for “Locally Engaged Staff Permanent employment” was the position: “Senior Visa Processing Officer/Senior Caseload Assurance Officer. Salary per month: Php 51,368.” (That is less than half the Australian minimum wage, hence only a job for a local.)

        But something changed in the Philippines in mid 2019.

        Subclass 300 visa processing time examples:

        Oct 2018 3.7 months
        Nov 2018 7.0 months
        Mar 2019 2.5 months
        Jul 2019 18.5 months
        Sep 2019 16.5 months
        Oct 2019 18.5 months
        Jan 2020 20.6 months
        Mar 2020 21.1 months

        The current situation in the Philippines is: The Australian Embassy in the Philippines is currently operating with essential staff only, who are focused on providing consular assistance to Australians in the Philippines.
        The Australian Visa Application Centres (VFS Global) in Manila and Cebu are closed until further notice.
        The Panel Physicians (St Lukes Medical Center and Nationwide Health Services) are closed until further notice.
        The processing of Student Visa Applications (where the applicant is currently outside of Australia) is suspended until further notice.

        1. So 300 visas of Filipino citizens coming to Australia, and who are living in the Philippines. Are being processed by people in the Philippines ?
          Is that the same for all countries, they are processed by someone in the same country as the applicant ?
          I thought the visas could be processed by someone in a few countries.

          If you are a Filipino citizen and living and working in another country. Then will your pmv 300 visa be processed by someone in the Philippines, or the country you are living and working in ?
          As Filipino citizens in other countries get their pmv 300 visas looked at and processed much faster, than people living in the Philippines.
          Well such has been my observation from many pmv applicants

          If pmv 300 visas are still being processed, and the applicant can’t currently enter Australia. What does that mean for the nine months ?
          Are the visas being processed and the start of the nine months being put on hold, until the applicant can actually enter Australia?
          As the waiting times have apparently reduced in March 2020 from the previous few months
          Yet the applicants can’t currently enter Australia

          1. If you are a Filipino citizen and living and working in another country, then your visa will normally be processed in the country of your residence.

            Most countries seem to process faster than the Philippines, these days.

          2. You ask: “If pmv 300 visas are still being processed, and the applicant can’t currently enter Australia. What does that mean for the nine months ?

            I am not sure what would happen, but the fact that very few are being granted, means they may delay the grants until people can travel.

            If a 300 is granted, then the applicant can apply for an exemption from the travel ban, and this will be considered based on relationship evidence. If the couple have been living together for 10 months before the 300 application, they probably stand a good chance to be allowed to travel, but if they have only met for a few weeks in total over a few visits, they would probably be refused.

        2. Also to add
          My fiancé and I are aware of a Filipino citizen who was living and working in Singapore. Her pmv 300 visa was lodged 3 months after ours. Hers was processed and granted 6 months later.
          My fiancé and I lodged 18 months ago and our application hasn’t even been looked at.
          So that woman’s application was processed in the Philippines? As she’s still a citizen of the Philippines
          If so then why was hers looked at and processed so much faster than ours ?
          If there is no bias on the country a person is living in
          We have also noticed several other cases of much quicker processing times for Filipino citizens, living in a country other than the Philippines

          1. Was that woman’s application processed in the Philippines, or in Singapore, where she was living?

            It would normally be done in Singapore.

            I am sure that Singapore processes faster than the Philippines these days.

          2. You state: We have also noticed several other cases of much quicker processing times for Filipino citizens, living in a country other than the Philippines.

            That confirms that the issue is in the processing in the Philippines, and not racism of Filipinos in general.

          3. You wrote, “If a 300 is granted, then the applicant can apply for an exemption from the travel ban, and this will be considered based on relationship evidence. If the couple have been living together for 10 months before the 300 application, they probably stand a good chance to be allowed to travel, but if they have only met for a few weeks in total over a few visits, they would probably be refused.”
            With regard to applying for an exemption on the ground of having been leaving together for 10 months before the visa approval, wouldn’t leaving together be interpreted entering a defacto relationship hence a violation of PMV condition 8515 and the dire consequence of visa cancellation?
            Your experienced opinion will be appreciated, thanks

          4. One actual example of that, is that I had been living for 10 months with my partner when we applied for the PMV300. It was not an issue, and helped to prove the relationship to be granted the 300 visa.

            I think this is a case of poor wording in the official forms. A PMV application these days needs to prove a relationship, similar to a de facto. It is correct that a PMV holder must not get married before entering Australia. They must marry after getting the visa, and within 9 months.

            Official wording: “Condition 8515 provides that “the holder of the visa must not marry or enter into a de facto relationship before entering Australia.”
            (https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2012L01105/Explanatory%20Statement/Text)

            The Partner visa 309 also has that condition 8515. And they MUST normally prove either marriage or a De Facto relationship, to be eligible for the visa.

            Something seems odd with that wording.

          5. I just looked at the wording specifically to the 300.

            We might cancel your visa if we find out you were engaged, married or in a de facto relationship before we granted you the visa but did not tell us.

            That bit at the end seems to over-rule any issue of being engaged or de-facto. Just make sure you have told them that you are engaged and living together. It seems logical to put that in the visa application, as it is a proof of relationship that they like to see.

        3. So you are saying that a persons pmv 300 visa, is processed in the country they are residing in. Not the country they are a citizen of, if that is different to the one they’re residing in ?

          If a person in another country logs in to the Australian immi page. That page is where they did their application . How does anyone know their country of residence ?

          My fiancé living in the Philippines, has done her application on the Australian immi webpage. I’m thinking other Filipino citizens residing in countries other than the Philippines, also did the same.
          So then how do the applications then get separated into where the applicant is residing ?

          Can’t see it being legal to grant a visa requiring a person to get to another country in nine months. If they can’t currently enter the country. And when they can is unknown. If they’re denying applications based solely on that. That needs looking into.

          Well I’m aware of one pmv 300 that was granted after the couple met only one time in person. Had only known each other for one month at the time they applied.

          1. You ask “How does anyone know their country of residence ?”

            When we did the PMV, the application asked for that information.

            The online application was then processed in Manila.

            If the applicant states they are living in Singapore then the embassy in Singapore would normally receive the application. However, it can go to any other country, depending on embassy capabilities at any time.

            I know of a few that were done in the country of current residence.

            Many PMVs have been granted in the past after just one meeting. However, for the current COVID-19 situation, they may hold back on such grants as they would be unlikely to get an exemption to travel.

          2. As for the professionalism
            They could put on the website and or contact peopie whose applications they’ve started,
            Say – We are currently processing applications. Due to the current travel ban, if your application is granted, we will not start your nine months until the ban is lifted

        4. My fiancé and I haven’t lived together for ten months. Our application does have over three years of evidence. Ten meetings in person. Records that we have communicated with each other, every single day for over three years.
          Financial records in the form of me sending her money on a regular basis for over two years. Seeing as we live in different countries, we can have no shared bank accounts or expenses such as utilities etc. So we figure that will show we do have some financial connection.

          That sure beats one month and one meeting in person.
          Also quite a few other ones that have been granted.

          I may hear it’s a case by case basis
          Yes perhaps, but legally a person can use other people’s application as a precedent. If they were to be denied on grounds in which they obviously had stronger evidence, than in an application that was granted.

          1. When you say: ” legally a person can use other people’s application as a precedent.

            That would probably only apply if your application was identical to theirs. And that includes the time it takes the applicants governments departments (both place of residence and citizenship) to reply to various requests from Australian immigration.

            It would not be easy to prove that, as we would have no way to obtain that information.

          2. By legal got at least having legal grounds
            I mean for this instance, if they say a relationship is not genuine.
            If one couple can show let’s say several photos together over three years. As well as other corroborating evidence over that time period.
            Compared to a couple with one month history and one meeting in person

            Comparing one thing to the same thing

          3. You mention what they say about delays due to covid
            However all of that is other institutions.
            Their processing is what’s so slow
            Our application was complete, it’s been sitting in cyberspace for nearly two years. While others lodged later have already been processed
            Yes seemingly due to the luck of people living in different countries
            Which wouldn’t be the issue if the system was managed more efficiently.

          4. Our application was complete, it’s been sitting in cyberspace for nearly two years. While others lodged later have already been processed
            This does appear to be a problem with the Philippines processing system at the moment.
            However, worldwide there appears to have been few, if any, subclass 300’s granted in April, and maybe also May so far.

            But it does not look like they do all they can, to have applications processed at the fastest rate“.
            I agree with you on that. They have no intention to process at the fastest rate, as they are limited with the numbers that can be granted, and they need to find a way to slow some down, rather than just reject them.

            Have you had any replies to previous enquiries asking about processing times?

          5. I haven’t made any enquires about processing times. All we have been doing is checking the immi website every now and then. To see what the current processing times are.
            Mostly get our info from online forums, from people who are going or have gone through the process.
            Plus I doubt an enquiry would be replied to with anything but bureaucratic runaround

          6. When we did an enquiry, for the visa for my wife from the Philippines, it caused them to look at it and we got the grant finalised a couple of weeks later.

            However, with probably no 300’s being processed anywhere right now, it may not do anything at the moment, but could be worth a short. Getting married and switching to a 309, could be something to consider? But even then, there is no certainty.

        5. I would think that a person processing these visas. Would have to open the application and read some of it. To find out where a person is residing.
          So then they see say Singapore and send it to Singapore to be processed ?
          Is that what’s happening ?
          Don’t see why they aren’t being processed in the applicants country of citizenship, country they’re going to or random outsourced country.
          Appears on the administration side of the proceedings, to be quite unprofessional for something costing over $7000 aud. Yes we all know this is nothing more than a huge love tax. Yes trying to be disguised by saying, oh we don’t want peopie faking it to get here.
          Yet the pages of evidence you need make that somewhat difficult. Actually the money for some is the easy part. Soms Elderly retired peopie have no problem putting up the cash. I am also aware of one Australian guy in his 30’s who payed the application fee for his fiancé. Then six months later he became involved with his housekeeper, and no longer returns any correspondence from his one time fiancé.
          I can go on a website to buy something for $10 and it will say – we are processing orders but experiencing delays due to virus.
          Why are we not getting the same courtesy, for something so expensive.
          Not to mention the emotional toll peopie go through.
          Asked to have a ready application
          Which yes we did over a year and a half ago. Now some of that is starting to expire. Yet other people’s applications get looked at first. Just because they’re living in a different country. Should be done on a first come first serve basis.
          Far as I know they’re all dated, go to immi Australia.

          1. You say: “I would think that a person processing these visas. Would have to open the application and read some of it. To find out where a person is residing.
            So then they see say Singapore and send it to Singapore to be processed ?
            Is that what’s happening ?

            In my view, I doubt it. The computer system is fully capable of directing to the relevant processing office directly, without human involvement. This would be done by using the residence information entered in the application. It would then be looked at by local staff.

          2. You mention: “I can go on a website to buy something for $10 and it will say – we are processing orders but experiencing delays due to virus.
            Why are we not getting the same courtesy, for something so expensive.

            I actually thought that Immigration were making it clear that there are delays due to the virus.

            This is one example:
            Some services relating to the visa application process may be impacted by COVID-19 and a range of services we rely on are increasingly unavailable.
            This includes overseas panel doctors (see below), English language testing facilities, biometric collection and paper application lodgement centres.
            While these services are unavailable, many applicants cannot meet visa requirements. Applicants will be given additional time to complete checks and provide the requested information.

            However, they could easily make it clearer, by giving a reply to all visa applications that due to the COVID-19 situation, and the ban on entry to Australia for most people, that visa grants will be delayed until the pandemic is over.

          3. ($7000 aud. Yes we all know this is nothing more than a huge love tax. Yes trying to be disguised by saying, oh we don’t want peopie faking it to get here.)
            Most people know that it was increased (from the $3,000 cost) to try to cut down the numbers of applications, even though it was stated to be a cost recovery.. In some ways it could have been a good thing, by reducing the numbers and speeding up application times for the genuine applicants. (We all know that there are a number that do fake it. About 10% get refused for various reasons.)

            But it didn’t work, application numbers didn’t really drop. And the number of available grants theoretically become less. This caused longer processing times, while people wait in the queue.

            They tend not to do ‘first come first served’, but it seems they might do the easiest applications first. Those with fewer issues, to be checked on, may well get granted earlier than those that involve more checks.

            One of the issues that causes longer processing times is the wait for information from various countries government bodies. This alone means that grants cannot be done on a ‘first come first served’ basis. That would be unfair on those whose information is readily available without any issues.

            It may not be a perfect system, but few systems are perfect.

            Having spent almost 4 years from first application to getting PR for my wife, I know it is a pain, but I have never considered it as racism.

            for example: Median Processing Times for subclass 309 visas in last 6 months of 2019.
            352 days London, UK.
            297 days Beirut, Lebanon.
            288 days Seoul, South Korea.
            665 days Manila, Philippines.

            (No similar data for subclass 300 visas yet, but probably about the same)

          4. Our application was complete when we lodged it.
            Now some has expired due to the slowness of processing.
            They ask you to have a ready application
            But it does not look like they do all they can, to have applications processed at the fastest rate.
            Why not send applications to countries that are currently processing less.

          5. You mention what they say about delays due to covid
            However all of that is other institutions.
            Their processing is what’s so slow
            Our application was complete, it’s been sitting in cyberspace for nearly two years. While others lodged later have already been processed
            Yes seemingly due to the luck of people living in different countries
            Which wouldn’t be the issue if the system was managed more efficiently.


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  21. Official Processing Times for the subclass 300 Visa in January 2020:

    Jan 2020: 16-22 = 75% took up to 16 months. 10% took over 22 months

    Some actual examples of processing times for January 2020 grants.

    300 Finalised after 7.5 months, from Tunisia
    300 Finalised after 9.2 months, from ?
    300 Finalised after 9.9 months, from Indonesia
    300 Finalised after 10.8 months, from USA
    300 Finalised after 20.6 months, from Philippines


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  23. subclass 300 finalisations in January 2020.
    Processing times are shown from the initial 300 application date.

    300 Finalised after 2.4 months, from Italy
    300 Finalised after 7.5 months, from Tunisia
    300 Finalised after 9.2 months, from ?
    300 Finalised after 9.9 months, from Indonesia
    300 Finalised after 10.8 months, from USA
    300 Finalised after 20.6 months, from Philippines

    1. Hello, Admin, and everyone.
      Does anyone have any info on those who had resided in China while lodging? I am a Ukrainian citizen, we have waited for almost 14 months. I am curious, whether our application got to Guangzhou, Hong Kong (the closest are these two) or Great Britain (as its Australian consulate is responsible for visas for Ukrainians). I see examples of visas granted in other Asian countries but never it was Hong Kong or China. We’ve provided all the documents, photos, screenshots, have stayed together for long, and been in many countries together. He has even visited my family in Ukraine, I have met some of his relatives, so there are many proves of how genuine we are. I also feel like consulates in Asian countries are slower at processing.
      Thanks

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